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Monday, July 24, 2017

BOOK REVIEW + GIVEAWAY: Surgeon's Story by Mark Oristano (Nonfiction)


Greetings Friends!

Today, I am participating in a blog tour stop for the medical nonfiction book Surgeon's Story by Mark Oristano.

Surgeon's Story

Rating:


Genre:  Nonfiction
Release Date:  2017


Synopsis:

What is it like to hold the beating heart of a two-day old child in your hand?  What is it like to counsel distraught parents as they make some of the most difficult decisions of their lives?
Noted pediatric heart surgeon Dr. Kristine Guleserian has opened up her OR, and her career, to author Mark Oristano to create Surgeon’s Story
Dr. Guleserian’s life, training and work are discussed in detail, framed around the incredibly dramatic story of a heart transplant operation for a two-year old girl whose own heart was rapidly dying.  Author Mark Oristano takes readers inside the operating room to get a first-hand look at pediatric heart surgeries most doctors in America would never attempt.
That’s because Dr. Guleserian is recognized as one of the top pediatric heart surgeons in America, one of a very few who have performed a transplant on a one-week old baby. Dr. Guleserian (Goo-liss-AIR-ee-yan) provided her expertise, and Oristano furnished his writing skills.
Readers will find all the drama, intensity, humor and compassion that they enjoy in their favorite fictionalized medical TV drama, but the actual accounts in Surgeon’s Story are even more compelling. One of the key characters in the book is 2-year-old Rylynn who was born with an often fatal disorder called Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and was successfully treated by Dr. Guleserian.
You can also check out the book trailer on YouTube.



For more information or to purchase:

AMAZON


About the Author:



Mark Oristano has been a professional writer/journalist since the age of 16. After growing up in suburban New York, Mark attended Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, majoring in broadcast journalism. After his junior year he was hired as a sports reporter by WFAA-TV, the ABC affiliate in Dallas, where he worked with sports director Verne Lundquist. He also anchored in Nashville, where his co-anchor was Oprah Winfrey.  Mark broadcast NFL games for the Dallas Cowboys and Houston Oilers. His first book, A Sportscaster's Guide to Watching Football, sold out it's first run.

You can connect with him on

FACEBOOK  |  TWITTER  |  WEBSITE  


Review:

I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for an honest and thoughtful review.

I have always been fascinated by medical memoirs and was really excited to read this book about a pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon.  This is an insightful and fascinating look into the world of medicine that really makes you feel that you are scrubbed in right along with Dr. G.  The book reads quickly even with all the detailed scientific information, but is never weighed down by medical jargon.  And while I'm not personally bothered by gory medical details, for those that are, you won't find that in this book.  The spotlight is more on all of the amazing work that Dr. G is providing to the country's tiniest patients.  Not only do you receive insight into Dr. G's average day, but you get to see what the children and their parents are experiencing as well.  

I really enjoyed reading about Dr. G's decision to become a doctor as well as her experiences in medical school and the training she received to become a surgeon.  Even as someone who stands at the top of her field, she remains humble and strives to keep learning new lifesaving techniques.  She is truly an inspiration to not only those in the medical field, but for women in general as a example of an accomplished woman succeeding in a predominantly male-dominated career.  

This is a very compelling read full of human interest that will keep you riveted until the very end.  


Book Excerpt:

The first task is to examine the heart to see if the preoperative diagnosis is correct. Dr. G uses delicate instruments to retract portions of the tricuspid valve and examine the extent of the defect of the ventricular septum, the wall between the two ventricles. She determines the exact size and shape of the VSD and trims the segment of pericardium she saved earlier in preservative. She cuts miniscule pieces of the pericardial tissue and sutures them along the walls of the VSD, creating anchor points for the actual covering. Each suturing is an intricate dance of fingers and forceps, needle and thread. Dr. G works with a small, hooked needle, grasping it with forceps, inserting the needle through the tissue, releasing and re-gripping with the forceps, pulling the hair-thin suture through, using a forceps in her other hand to re-grip the needle again and repeat. The pericardial tissue being sewn over the VSD has to be secure, and it has to stand up to the pressure of blood pumping through Claudia’s heart at the end of the operation. This isn’t like repairing knee ligaments, which can rest without use and heal slowly. Claudia’s heart is going to restart at the end of this operation, and whatever has been sewn into it has to hold, and work, the first time. The VSD repair involves cautious work around the tricuspid valve, and their proximity is a concern because the valve opens and closes along the ventricular septum with each beat. Dr. G and her team find that it’s preferable to actually divide the cords of the tricuspid valve to better expose the VSD. After the patch is fully secured, the tricuspid valve is repaired.
Things don’t go as smoothly during the attempt to repair the pulmonary valve. When Dr. G looks inside Claudia’s heart she discovers that the pulmonary valve is not nearly large enough, and it’s malformed. It only has two flaps where there should be three. She repairs it by what she later says is “just putting in a little transannular patch.”
Here’s what it’s like to “just” put a transannular patch on the pulmonary artery of a child as small as Claudia:
First, take a piece of well-cooked elbow macaroni. Tuck it away in a bowl of pasta that has a bit of residual marinara sauce still floating around in it. Take several different sized knitting needles. Slowly, without damaging the macaroni, insert one of the knitting needles into it to see if you can gauge the width of the macaroni on which you’re operating. Then using a delicate, incredibly sharp blade, cut a small hole in the piece of elbow macaroni, maybe a little larger than the height of one of the letters on the page in front of you. Now use pliers to pick up a small needle with thread as fine as human hair in it. Use another pliers to pick up a tiny piece of skin that looks like it was cut from an olive, so thin that light shines through it. Take the needle and sew the olive skin on to the hole you’ve cut in the piece of macaroni. When you’re finished sewing, hook up the piece of macaroni to a comparable size tube coming from the faucet on the kitchen sink, and see if you can run some water through the macaroni without the patch leaking.
That’s the food analogy. Those are the dimensions Dr. G worked with as she patched Claudia’s pulmonary artery. She made it a little wider to give it a chance to work more efficiently, to transport more blood with less blockage, requiring less work for the right ventricle so that the built-up heart muscle could return to a more normal size. It wasn’t the repair she’d planned to make, but it was the most suitable under the circumstances, and it gave Claudia her best chance.
Before restoring Claudia’s natural circulation, the team makes certain that no air is in the heart or the tubes from the pump, because it could be pumped up to the brain. Air in the brain is not a safe thing. When all the repairs are completed, Claudia is rewarmed and weaned from the bypass machine. She was on pump for 114 minutes and her aorta was clamped for 77 minutes, not an extraordinary length of time in either case.
Claudia’s heart starts up on its own, with a strong rhythm. With her heart beating again the beeps, and the peaks and valleys on her monitor return. All is well. An echo technician wheels a portable machine into the OR and puts a sensor down Claudia’s throat where it lodges behind her heart to perform a transesophageal echo —a more detailed view than the normal, external echo. Everything looks good. Chest drains are put in to handle post-operative drainage, and wires are placed for external pacemakers, should anything go wrong with Claudia’s heart rhythm during her recovery from surgery. Dr. G draws Claudia’s ribcage back together with stainless steel wires, perfectly fastened and tightly tucked down.
Claudia and the surgical team return to the CVICU, and Dr. G monitors her reentry to the unit, making sure the nurses understand Claudia’s condition and the proper procedures to be followed for the next 24 hours. From there, Dr. G enters a small room tucked away from the noise of the unit to meet with the family. Claudia’s mother, father, and aunt are waiting. Dr. G sees Mom wiping tears away.
“Are you crying? Oh, no, no need to be crying, everything is fine.” Her wide smile reassured Mom who put away her tissues.

Giveaway Info



Mark Oristano is giving away a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

Terms & Conditions:

By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive a $25 Amazon Gift Card.
This giveaway ends midnight July 28.
Winner will be contacted via email on July 29.
Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

a Rafflecopter giveaway
Many thanks to Mark Oristano and Pump Up Your Book!  It was a pleasure providing a review.

Be sure to check out the other blog stops on the tour.

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